Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages Review

Have you had the Polish hot dog from the Costco food court? Would you like to be able to make your own at home? These Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages are the same ones that they serve in the food court!

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages package on a table.
Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages

I’ve actually never had a Polish hot dog from the Costco food court, but I’ve seen a lot of people raving about how delicious they are. I picked up these Kirkland Signature Polish Sausages during my most recent Costco trip so I could try making them at home.

Other hot dogs and sausages from Costco include the Costco Siwin Japanese Style Sausage, Costco Smokey River Meat Company Turkey Breakfast Sausages, Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Wieners and the Costco Olympic Craft Meats Garlic Sausage.

Cooked Costco Polish Sausage on a bun with sweet potato fries beside it served on a white plate.
Ready to enjoy with some sweet potato fries!

Location in Store

These Polish sausages are found in the refrigerated section near the cheeses, deli meats and other sausages. The item number is 575676.

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausage in a bun, closeup image of a bite taken out of it.
What the inside of the sausage looks like!

Taste

These sausages are nearly identical to the Kirkland Signature Beef Wieners in size and texture. The taste is very similar too. The casing and fat content of the meat seem exactly the same as the Beef Weiners.

The only real difference is in the seasoning, though it’s certainly not a dramatic difference. It’s hard to explain as it’s subtle. I would say the Kirkland Polish Sausages are a bit more garlicky and have a very slight spiciness/heat to them that the Beef Wieners are missing.

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausage on a bun with the bun open, served on a white plate.
This Costco Polish Sausage was cooked on the barbecue.

I was expecting a hot dog that’s quite different than the Beef Wieners, but I was surprised by how minor the differences are in a taste comparison. I’m not disappointed by the similarities, because I love the Beef Wieners and find the Polish Sausages equally delicious. Only a true hot dog connoisseur will be able to tell the difference between the two!

Cost

The price is $17.99 Canadian a package of 14 beef Polish sausages at Costco. These sausages are quite large, so the price is reasonable. You’re not saving much over buying one ready to eat at the food court though!

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages package, close up image.
The same sausages served in the Costco Food Court!

Convenience

The Costco Polish sausages are sure to be a hit at any barbecue this summer! The sausages can be stored in the refrigerator for quite a while – the best before date is about a month from the date we purchased them. If you’re not going to eat them all right away I highly suggest freezing them. That’s what we do!

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages cooking instructions.
Cooking instructions.

There are few different ways to cook the sausages: on the grill, broiled in the oven, cooked in water in a pan on the stove, or in the microwave. We always grill our sausages/hot dogs and that’s the method I would recommend for heating them, especially during the summer.

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausage before cooking it, on a white plate.
What a Costco Polish Sausage looks like before heating it.

Nutrition

Calories

One Costco Kirkland Signature Polish Sausage contains 370 calories, 31 grams of fat, five grams of carbohydrates, zero grams of fibre, three grams of sugar, 16 grams of protein and 1,250 milligrams of sodium! That’s a TON of sodium. If you’re sodium sensitive due to a medical condition, I recommend steering clear of these. Even healthy people probably don’t want to eat these too often – they fall into the junk food/treat category for sure.

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages nutrition facts from package.
Look at that sodium! Wow!

Ingredients

The ingredients list on the Polish sausages doesn’t surprise me. I’m glad beef is the first ingredient listed. There are a few food additives/preservatives along with beef, water and sugar. The Polish Sausages are all beef, gluten-free and don’t have meat by-products or corn syrup. They’re a product of the USA.

Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages ingredients from package.
Ingredients from package.

Scoring

Taste: 8/10

Cost: 7.5/10

Convenience: 9.5/10

Nutrition: 1/10

Overall

Give it a try!

I think the Polish Sausages from Costco are perfect for a barbecue or group meal. They’re pretty tasty! They aren’t remotely healthy though, so consuming them in moderation is wise!

Do you prefer the Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Wieners or the Costco Kirkland Signature Polish Sausages?


Please note that this review was not paid for or sponsored by any third party. This product was purchased by Costcuisine for the purpose of producing this review. The opinions in this review are strictly those of Costcuisine. Costcuisine is not affiliated with Costco or any of its suppliers. In the event that Costcuisine receives compensation for a post from the manufacturer of a product or some other third party, the arrangement will be clearly disclosed (including where the manufacturer of a product provides Costcuisine with a free sample of the product).

Join the Costcuisine email list - never miss a review!

Please wait...

Thank you for signing up!

3 thoughts on “Costco Kirkland Signature Beef Polish Sausages Review”

  1. Grilled or broiled is the only way to go with these, I think. They taste far better than when you get them at the food court, presumably boiled or steamed there. The flavor is just so much better when you grill!

    Reply
  2. I’ve been purchasing the polish costco hotdogs for years. But sometimes they run out of polish, and I buy the regular Costco hotdogs. Usually, I’ll steam them for 1/2 hr. in the basket of my rice cooker, and bake the buns in the air-fryer for about 2 to 3 min.
    Unless you can barbecue them, I prefer them steamed.

    Reply

Leave a Comment