Costco Pedon Organic Brown Rice & Quinoa Spaghetti Review

This Costco Pedon Organic Brown Rice & Quinoa Spaghetti is gluten-free, allergen-free and vegan! Can this wheat-free spaghetti taste anywhere near as good as regular spaghetti? And what does the hint of turmeric in it do to the flavor profile? As someone who loves pasta, I was skeptical, but intrigued!

Image of the box of Costco Pedon Organic Brown Rice & Quinoa Spaghetti sitting on a table.
Costco Pedon Organic Brown Rice & Quinoa Spaghetti.

Although I’m not entirely gluten-free currently I do follow a gluten-free diet during the week and was gluten-free during my entire pregnancy and grew to love wheat-free pasta! I find it doesn’t taste much different when it’s covered in sauce! I’ve tried a few Pedon products that I’ve enjoyed so when I saw this brown rice and quinoa spaghetti at Costco I wanted to try it.

Top down image of the prepared spagehtti with a red meat sauce served on a white plate.
I served the spaghetti with a meat sauce.

Some other pasta from Costco I’ve reviewed are the Pedon More than Pasta Four Bean Linguine, Banza Rotini Chickpea Pasta, Duso’s Lemon Ricotta Mezzaluna, Pedon More than Pasta Yellow Lentil Spaghetti, Kirkland Signature Chicken Penne Alfredo, Kirkland Signature Four Cheese and Spinach Manicotti and the Vegan Scoiattolo Grilled Vegetable Organic Ravioli.

Location in Store

This is located in the aisle with the flour, baking supplies and rice. The item number is 1673703.

Side view image of the prepared spagehtti with a red meat sauce served on a white plate.
The spaghetti noodles break apart easily.

Taste

I tried the spaghetti both on it’s own without any sauce and with meat sauce. On it’s own you barely can tell the spaghetti doesn’t have wheat and is made of rice and quinoa. What you do notice is the slight hint of tumeric, which I could do without, I just don’t find it necessary and it adds a bit of an odd aftertaste.

Side view image of the prepared spagehtti with a red meat sauce served on a white plate.
Ready to eat!

With sauce this tastes exactly like any other spaghetti and the flavor of the tumeric is overpowered. The texture and shape and size is similar to spaghetti but one thing both my husband and I notice is that the noodles break apart easily.

Top down image of cooked spaghetti on a white plate without any sauce on it.
What the spaghetti looks like without any sauce on it.

Cost

The one kiligram box costs $12.49 Canadian at Costco, which isn’t nearly as cheap as wheat spaghetti, you’re definitely paying a little more for it being gluten-free.

Image of the product description for the spaghetti from the back of the box.
The spaghetti is produced in a gluten-free facility.

Convenience

This spaghetti is super simple to cook. I think it pairs well with both red sauce as well as cream sauce and could even work in a stir fry!

Image of the cooking instructions for the spaghetti from the box.
Cooking instructions.

The best before date listed on the box is about a year and a half from when I purchased the spaghetti.

Nutrition

Calories

1/12th of a package contains 310 calories, two and a half grams of fat, 66 grams of carbohydrates, four grams of fibre, zero grams of sugars, seven grams of protein and zero grams of sodium.

Pasta is obviously high in carbohydrates and I appreciate that there isn’t any sodium or sugar in the pasta.

Image of the nutrition facts label from the box.
Nutrition facts.

Ingredients

There are only three ingredients listed! Brown rice flour, quinoa flour and tumeric powder. The pasta is gluten-free, vegan, and organic.

Image of the ingredients label from the back of the box.
Ingredients.

Scoring

Taste: 7.5/10

Cost: 7/10

Convenience: 9/10

Nutrition: 8.5/10

Overall

Give it a try!

I prefer the Pedon Yellow Lentil Spaghetti over this one because it has more protein and I like the taste better but this brown rice & quinoa one isn’t bad!

Have you tried this spaghetti? What did you think of it?


Please note that this review was not paid for or sponsored by any third party. This product was purchased by Costcuisine for the purpose of producing this review. The opinions in this review are strictly those of Costcuisine. Costcuisine is not affiliated with Costco or any of its suppliers. In the event that Costcuisine receives compensation for a post from the manufacturer of a product or some other third party, the arrangement will be clearly disclosed (including where the manufacturer of a product provides Costcuisine with a free sample of the product).

Join the Costcuisine email list - never miss a review!

Please wait...

Thank you for signing up!

6 thoughts on “Costco Pedon Organic Brown Rice & Quinoa Spaghetti Review”

  1. I don’t understand why you give it such high nutrition marks if you need to eat gluten-free I can understand wanting to buy this product but only less than 2% of people need to eat gluten free so for the other 98% of us the regular version is much cheaper and more nutritious as the process of removing gluten also removes valuable nutrition from foods so gluten-free is not a good option unless you absolutely need it As per doctor’s orders

    Reply
    • Gluten-free isn’t a process of removing gluten from wheat. It’s using ingredients that don’t have gluten in them. No nutrition is lost. Wheat, barley, Rye, spelt etc contain gluten — rice, almond, coconut, buckwheat, millet, corn, lentil and other flours don’t contain gluten. Gluten-free can be more nutritious than wheat depending on the ingredients. People who have wheat allergies, gluten intolerances, or celiac disease would happily use products like these.

      Reply
  2. All pasta is Vegan. Unless one has a gluten free allergy or other restrictions, it seems absurd to spend this much on pasta. Then again, without the aforementioned issues and if you’re easily influenced by trends, you’ll likely follow a gluten free diet. Even diabetics or those on Keto aren’t going to buy this especially when you can buy wheat pasta on sale for around $1.33 kg. Just limit your portions.

    So no, not going to try.

    Reply
    • Actually not true. Pasta can include egg in it and may not be vegan (my son is anaphylactic to all forms of egg — so, I’m always checking ingredients). Plus, there’s no such thing as a gluten allergy. There are wheat allergies, gluten intolerances, or celiac disease.

      Reply

Leave a Comment